EDUCATION MATTERS—SANFORD SCHOOL'S PRIVATE SCHOOL BLOG

Learn more about current school issues and trends from Sanford School’s educational experts.  Sanford’s blog is sure to help you navigate your child’s educational journey.

Libbie Zimmer

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Libbie Zimmer is Head of Lower School at Sanford School in Hockessin, Delaware.

Recent Posts

Investing In Early Childhood Education Is Worthwhile

Posted by Libbie Zimmer on March 22, 2019 at 12:30 PM

When asked, "Should our family invest (i.e. pay tuition) in our children's early years of education or wait until "it counts" when they're in high school preparing to go to college?" Emphatically I say, "Invest in the early years." This is an incredibly difficult question for anyone to answer knowing that each and every learning stage is valuable; however, when posed with ranking when education "counts" most, it is absolutely and definitively during those first years of life, and here's why.

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Topics: Education, Academics, Parenting Tips, Preschool

The Hidden Benefits of Chores

Posted by Libbie Zimmer on December 1, 2017 at 12:15 PM
This past weekend, I raked the never-ending supply of leaves and prepared the yard for cooler weather. While working, I remembered a similarly warm autumn weekend when my son, William, was 10. I was dirty, sweaty, thirsty, and tired from the outdoor chores, and found William cozily engrossed in a book. (One he'd read so many times, the spine was no longer intact.)

With irritation in my voice, "Rather than reading that book again, please come help me with the chores!" William earnestly responded, "But mommy, you   like  working in the yard and I don't."  William's right. I do enjoy working in the yard and much of that joy blossomed at an early age when I "had to" do chores. Now, I fondly remember planting tulip bulbs with my dad in the fall, harvesting and "snapping" beans with my grandmother in the summer, and hauling firewood in the winter.
 
William's reply is important to me for three reasons:  
  • From a young age, he noticed his parents doing chores without complaint but with purpose.
  • As an adult, I connect even laborious childhood chores with some of my most vivid and positive childhood memories.
  • Chores at home fall into two categories:   want  tos  and   have  tos .
Work at school can also feel like a   want to  or a   have to. For instance, a child may like:
  • Calculating numbers but thinks   solving  word problems is arduous
  • Dumping out materials to build but prefers someone else pick up
  • Talking about ideas but doesn't like writing them on paper or via keyboard
  • Creating games on the playground but doesn't like  compromise
  • Being the line-leader but doesn't like being second in line
As parents and teachers, we work hard to keep things fun and exciting for our children, sometimes feeling like we haven't succeeded because our children are indifferent or unwilling. And, if not careful, we even adjust and appease rather than adhering to and restating the expectations.
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Topics: Health & Wellness, Parenting Tips

Sleep Routine—One of the Best Gifts for Your Child This Holiday

Posted by Libbie Zimmer on December 20, 2016 at 3:20 PM

'Tis The Season To Be Jolly!

As we plan holiday trips and travel, being mindful of children's sleep routines are equally, if not more important. As parents, the more we protect sleep routines, the happier the holiday celebrations will be. Consider the upcoming holiday hints to keep sleeping patterns a priority.

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Topics: Health & Wellness, Parenting Tips

Schools of the Future

Posted by Libbie Zimmer on December 1, 2015 at 3:00 PM

In a recent TED (Technology, Entertainment, and Design) talk, now-former National Association of Independent Schools' President Pat Bassett presented on “Schools of the Future.” Rather than evoking a Jetsons’ cartoon with robots and hover crafts, the School of the Future looks and feels very much like many in our area. Such schools, Bassett claims, make five institutional shifts.

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Topics: Education, Academics, Sanford School